“Just thought I would let you know that I had a very successful weeks skiing in Verbier and got back last weekend. Weather fantastic and knee held up very well. Many, many thanks.”

“I couldn't ask for a better surgeon than Neil, he has honestly changed my life in 1 year and I can't thank him enough.”

“I would sincerely like to thank you and your team for the work you did on my knee after the x-ray revealed a 'nasty' break. Your expertise has given me back the use of this leg and I can now walk unaided for half a mile or more. The previous knee operation has also been a complete success.”

“The process from start to finish was smooth and efficient. I always knew where I was in the process, what to expect and when. A thoroughly professional service with a smile.”

“Pre-op information first class. Post-op conditions also first class. Very successful operation.”

“I am now in week 6 after the operation on my knee and I feel I must express my admiration for your skill and delight at the result. I am walking well and striding confidently into a bright new future. Many thanks.”

“Recovery from my knee operation was much quicker than expected. By 10 months I hardly knew I'd had problems with my knee. Able to walk properly again without any thought.”

“Care very good. Mr Bradbury was faultless. Would have liked to see specialist physiotherapist, Genevieve, all through my recovery as she was very helpful. Saw her at 6 months after my knee operation.”

“Mr Bradbury did a fantastic job on my left knee. At 75 I now have my life back!”

“You all did so much to relieve my anxiety and concerns with my knee replacement. I shall remember you with gratitude every time I walk the dog in the future. Thank you”

Knee cartilage surgery

Knee cartilage surgery

 

In the knee, there are areas of cartilage tissue which act like shock absorbers in the joint – these are called menisci. There are also areas of cartilage covering the ends of the long bones at the knee joint – these are called articular cartilages. Both of these areas of cartilage may become damaged causing significant problems for patients.

When doctors talk about a cartilage injury to a knee, they usually mean an injury to one of the menisci. See meniscus repair surgery.

However, the knee also has cartilage covering the ends of the bones in the joint – this is called articular cartilage – and damage can occur here as well.

Symptoms of cartilage damage include swelling, joint pain, stiffness and a decreased range of movement in the affected joint. Cartilage covers the surface of joints, enabling bones to slide over one another while reducing friction and preventing damage. It helps to support your weight when you move, bend, stretch and run.

Articular cartilage damage is one of the most common and potentially serious types of cartilage damage, and usually affects the knee joint. The damage can result in pain, swelling and some loss of mobility.

Non-surgical treatments, such as physiotherapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are usually recommended for minor to moderate cases of cartilage damage.

What does surgery involve?

There are a number of surgical techniques available, such as encouraging the growth of new cartilage, or taking a piece of healthy cartilage from elsewhere in the joint and using it to replace damaged cartilage.

The Chondrotissue Graft is the latest development in articular cartilage repair and or replacement surgery. This is a high-tech scaffold that is a sterile absorbable matrix sponge-like textile made of non-woven polyglycolic acid treated with hyaluronic acid. It has been shown to induce mesenchymal progenitor cells (stem cells) to differentiate into cartilage cells.

Microfracture is an excellent technique for treating small patches (less than 1cm² defects). It can be performed easily via keyhole (arthroscopic) surgery and does not require complicated equipment.

In the most serious cases, the entire joint may need to be replaced with an artificial joint, such as a knee replacement or hip replacement.